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signage/wheelchair (ongoing series)

staticwheelchair

activewheelchair

I rarely see this second image in use, but I was gratified to see it near the entrances and restrooms at MOMA when I visited this summer.

03/28/10: Found the newer image in use at Marshalls, in a shopping plaza here in Cambridge. Bargain-basement prices AND evolved design sense:

activechairmarshalls

8 thoughts on “signage/wheelchair (ongoing series)

  1. Right. This is a great idea. I suggest a tagging run of these. We create the signage and “replace” old signs.

    I think there should be a unique sign for wheelchair parking though. One that signifies the unique situation of having a “disabled” driver. I’ll start doing parking lots once you get a good design Sara!

    What would be best is an “overlay” design, that makes use of the passive wheelchair image but makes it active. Something like (but not like) a steering wheel placed in front of the arms of the figure.

    You know, like this: http://www.collegehumor.com/picture:1928910?ref=chz

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  4. Sara, this symbol is in use all over the Portland, Oregon TriMet light rail system. It’s energetic and great. I’m an architect in California, and am going to use it or the recently-adopted NY version it in my projects. Here’s a link to the NY article:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2014/07/29/the-handicap-symbol-gets-an-update-at-least-in-new-york-state

    I’d love to know if other people have had alternatives to the old static ISA in their projects. I imagine that some building departments would fear doing anything different.

    I’m also a Building Standards Commissioner here in California, and am looking into how we could adopt a new symbol.

  5. Hi Erich, that NY symbol in the Post is also our symbol (see quotes from me in that piece!). The one here is one I documented a long time ago, way before our project began. We’re not the first to re-design it, just the first to make it a social design effort. You can get the stencil through our current site, accessibleicon.org, but the image itself is also in the public domain, so you can use it however you like. Thanks for the kind words, and keep us posted!

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